nprfreshair:

Downton Abbey: Now available in gingerbread!

New season starts in January, so it’s time to get ready for more delightful Maggie Smith moments.

Downton Abbey on The Sound of Young America Bullseye

Hugh Bonneville, Dan Stevens and Joanne Froggatt from the totally unstuffy costume drama Downton Abbey talk about the peerage system, upstairs and downstairs love affairs  that make us swoon, and the show’s bridge between the old customs and  modernity.  The second season of the show begins airing January 8th on  PBS’s Masterpiece.  (Embed or share)

Downton Abbey on The Sound of Young America Bullseye

Hugh Bonneville, Dan Stevens and Joanne Froggatt from the totally unstuffy costume drama Downton Abbey talk about the peerage system, upstairs and downstairs love affairs that make us swoon, and the show’s bridge between the old customs and modernity. The second season of the show begins airing January 8th on PBS’s Masterpiece. (Embed or share)

I watched the first episode of Downton Abbey last night and here’s the thing: I don’t think I’ve ever liked a television show more after one episode than I like Downton Abbey right now. Not The Wire, not Deadwood, not Arrested Development, not Lost, not Mad Men. Well, maybe Mad Men.

I love me some upstairs, downstairs.* It’s that simple. I think perhaps I was a valet in a past life. Rules of the Game, Gosford Park, The Magician, all among my favorites. I’m sure there are others too. But it’s early and I don’t wish to get encyclopedic about it. At any rate, one episode in I’m ready to call it, Downton Abbey portrays the upstairs, downstairs dynamic in a more interesting fashion than anything I’ve seen. Which is not to say that I find it more interesting as a whole than Rules of the Game, Gosford Park or The Magician. Oh no, far from it. I’m only one episode in for heaven’s sake.

*Oddly, I’ve never seen a second of the BBC show Upstairs, Downstairs.