Ingmar Bergman Names The Eleven Films He Liked Above All Others
"I have gotten into baseball recently, and whenever I have trouble writing, I think about the pace of baseball. It’s slow. You strike out a lot, even if you’re great. It’s mostly individual, but when you have to work together, it must be perfect. My desktop picture is of the Red Sox during the World Series. They aren’t winning; they’re just grinding out another play. This, for me, is very helpful to have in my mind while writing."

Greta Gerwig on writing & baseball

From New York Times Magazine

"A cop (Carl Weathers) takes on a union-busting auto exec (Craig T. Nelson) whose tactics include murder."
1988 was an exciting time.

"A cop (Carl Weathers) takes on a union-busting auto exec (Craig T. Nelson) whose tactics include murder."

1988 was an exciting time.

"Learn to love solitude, to be more alone with yourselves. The tragedy of today’s young people is that they try to unite on the basis of carrying out noisy and aggressive actions so as not to feel lonely, and this is a sad thing. The individual must learn from childhood to be on his own, for this doesn’t mean to be lonely: it means to not get bored with oneself, because a person who finds himself bored when he is alone, it seems to me, is a person in danger."

— Andrei Tarkovsky (via bikesinspace)

(Source: funeral-wreaths, via bbook)

criterioncast:

Check out our good friend Kogonada’s wonderful new video, looking at “passageways” in the films of Yasujiro Ozu.

If you’ve forgotten, he created the epic “one point perspective” / Kubrick video.

Great Directors, 2009 (dir. Angela Ismailos)

(Source: oldfilmsflicker, via bbook)

Orson Welles Remembers his Stormy Friendship with Ernest Hemingway

"In this fascinating clip from a 1974 interview by Michael Parkinson of the BBC, Orson Welles describes his “very strange relationship” with Ernest Hemingway, casting himself in a story of their first meeting as a torero opposed to Hemingway’s bull." (Open Culture)

Happy Birthday to legendary footballer and amateur filmmaker Jacques Tati!

Happy Birthday to legendary footballer and amateur filmmaker Jacques Tati!


“For ten years we had all been told to go out and die for freedom and democracy; but now the war was over, The Red Shoes told us to go out and die for art.” — Michael Powell

“For ten years we had all been told to go out and die for freedom and democracy; but now the war was over, The Red Shoes told us to go out and die for art.” — Michael Powell

(Source: strangewood)

missingozu:

Peanuts & Ozu

missingozu:

Peanuts & Ozu

(via bbook)

eye-contact:

Harriet Andersson in Summer with Monika (1953, dir. Ingmar Bergman).
“And that last shot of Nights of Cabiria, when Giulietta Masina stares fixedly into the camera: have we forgotten that this, too, appeared in the last reel but one of Summer With Monika? Have we forgotten that we had already experienced–but with a thousand times more force and poetry–that sudden conspiracy between actor and spectator which so aroused André Bazin’s enthusiasm, when Harriet Andersson, laughing eyes clouded with confusion and riveted on the camera, calls on us to witness her disgust in choosing hell instead of heaven?”  Jean-Luc Godard, Cahiers du Cinéma, 1958.
“Summer With Monika, in fact, already is Et Dieu…créa la femme, but brought off brilliantly, without a single flaw, without a single hesitation, with total lucidity in both dramatic and moral construction and in its development, in other words its mise en scène….One must see Summer With Monika, if only for the extraordinary moment when Harriet Andersson, before making love with the man she has already thrown out once before, stares fixedly into the camera, her laughing eyes clouded with confusion, and calls on us to witness her disgust at involuntarily choosing hell instead of heaven. It is the saddest shot in the history of the cinema.” Jean-Luc Godard, Arts (1958).
Submitted by bifitusdechocolate

It is an extraordinary moment. Summer with Monika bridges the gap between Italian neorealism and the French New Wave. Fascinating that one of Bergman’s lesser films is perhaps his most influential.

eye-contact:

Harriet Andersson in Summer with Monika (1953, dir. Ingmar Bergman).

“And that last shot of Nights of Cabiria, when Giulietta Masina stares fixedly into the camera: have we forgotten that this, too, appeared in the last reel but one of Summer With Monika? Have we forgotten that we had already experienced–but with a thousand times more force and poetry–that sudden conspiracy between actor and spectator which so aroused André Bazin’s enthusiasm, when Harriet Andersson, laughing eyes clouded with confusion and riveted on the camera, calls on us to witness her disgust in choosing hell instead of heaven?”  Jean-Luc Godard, Cahiers du Cinéma, 1958.

“Summer With Monika, in fact, already is Et Dieu…créa la femme, but brought off brilliantly, without a single flaw, without a single hesitation, with total lucidity in both dramatic and moral construction and in its development, in other words its mise en scène….One must see Summer With Monika, if only for the extraordinary moment when Harriet Andersson, before making love with the man she has already thrown out once before, stares fixedly into the camera, her laughing eyes clouded with confusion, and calls on us to witness her disgust at involuntarily choosing hell instead of heaven. It is the saddest shot in the history of the cinema.” Jean-Luc Godard, Arts (1958).

Submitted by bifitusdechocolate

It is an extraordinary moment. Summer with Monika bridges the gap between Italian neorealism and the French New Wave. Fascinating that one of Bergman’s lesser films is perhaps his most influential.

thepenguinpress:

A first look at the new Great Gatsby film, arriving this December. Good news if you enjoyed Moulin Rouge. Bad news if you did not.

Yikes!

A historical materialist cannot do without the notion of a present which is not a transition, but in which times stands still and has come to a stop. For this notion defines the present in which he himself is writing history. Historicism gives the “eternal” image of the past; historical materialism supplies a unique experience with the past. The historical materialist leaves it to others to be drained by the whore called “Once upon a time” in historicism’s bordello. He remains in control of his powers, man enough to blast open the continuum of history.

- Walter Benjamin, “Theses on the Philosophy of History


I watched Better Off Dead for the first time in a few years. I was struck once again by how well it is aging. It is aging well in part because its cultural references—Howard Cosell, Rocky, Frankenstein, Flintstones, Stalin, cute European exchange students, pernicious Asian stereotypes—never go out of style. The film is not burdened by an abundance of stale 80’s tropes. The car-repair montage is its lone major misstep. We can forgive Elizabeth Daily at the school dance because, well, Dottie.


It is three plot elements that would have at the time seemed like sturdy cultural touchstones—skiing, paper boys and space shuttles—that make the film feel distant to me. If the movie were made today I cannot imagine it including any of those things. Replace with snowboarding, [I don’t know do even have jobs these days] and something something internet.


The 30-year-old soundtrack in this film sounds less dated than the notion that we can send a space shuttle into outer space! We lost. We are left with memories of the future.

(Source: openculture.com)

Initially the operation was marginally successful. However, the allied advance was delayed by the demolition of a DVD.

Initially the operation was marginally successful. However, the allied advance was delayed by the demolition of a DVD.